Tag Archive | Outagamie County Master Gardener Association

All-Purpose Fertilizer for Vegetables

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Nice, rich compost

Every year, we get the same questions in a variety of formats:  why won’t my vegetables grow? What should I do to grow more tomatoes? Do I need different types of fertilizer for my different vegetables? The answer to all of these questions is the best fertilizer for your soil and vegetables: compost! Compost is the all-purpose answer to everything, and if you have enough of it you won’t need much of anything else. Though different crops have different needs, they will be able to serve themselves from the smorgasbord provided by healthy soil with plenty of compost in it. Once you start adding specific fertilizers, you start having to pay attention to each individual diet.

Salad greens, for example, want lots of nitrogen to promote the fast growth of leafy tissue. Peppers, on the other hand, are more eager for the potassium that promotes flower and fruit development. Although they too need nitrogen, they’d make great big green leafy bushes with nary a pepper in sight if you gave them a lettuce-appropriate dose.

And major nutrients like nitrogen and potassium are just the beginning. There are dozens of micronutrients, such as boron, calcium, and copper, that plants must have — in different amounts — to thrive.

In practice, it can be hard to create soil so fertile that no amendment is necessary, especially when growing vegetables in a small space. But before you break out the fertilizer cookbook and start concocting special meals for all the crops you want to grow, make sure the soil is well drained and well aerated, and that the pH is between 6 and 7 (the best range for most vegetables). Ensuring these conditions exist may be all you need to do. If the soil is bad or the pH out of whack, it won’t matter what you put on the table, the vegetables won’t be able to eat.

by Vicki Schilleman, OCMGA Master Gardener

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Authors in our Midst and at our Garden Conference – #1

Master Gardener and author Tammy Borden

One of our Master Gardeners, Tammy Borden, is also a published author and accomplished singer. Tammy was the emcee at our recent Garden Conference, as well as the Chair of the committee that planned and executed the event. She’s a giving and spiritual human being. From the amazon page showcasing her book:

Every soul longs for purpose and new life. But when we’re in the midst of a cold, dark winter with no hope on the horizon, it can feel like life is futile and spring will never come.

Broken dreams, loss, addiction, betrayal, fears, guilt, and haunting reminders of our past can overwhelm our souls. We dream of a day when we can break free from the bondage and silence the toxic voices that play over and over in our minds, convincing us we’re failures and that things will never change.

So we search. We try more. Pray more. Read more. Thinking we just need to believe more. Yet the peace and joy we desperately seek continue to elude us, and it seems as though God does, too. We’re left feeling more alone and empty than before.

In A Perennial Life, Tammy Borden invites you to newly discover who you are and, more importantly, who God truly is so you can let go of past regrets and experience the abundant life you’re meant to live. Through heart-gripping true stories, playful humor, raw confessions, and transparent admissions of life’s deepest longings, she’ll help you embrace and redeem your own story — your seasons of life — so you can transform, grow, and unveil the significant purpose your heart longs for.

 

by OCMGA Master Gardener Vicki Schilleman

Straw Bale Gardening – take 2

Guest speaker Jim Beard shares information about Straw Bale Gardening

I’ve done posts before on Straw Bale Gardening (see June 9, 2016 here), but I thought a repeat was in order as we’re all thinking about getting our gardens going for 2017. For those who not yet tried it, this might be the perfect alternative to creating a big vegetable garden. At our Garden Conference on April 1, guest speaker Jim Beard (subject of October 15, 2015 post here) had a wonderful presentation about the benefits of trying straw bale gardening.

According to Jim, you plant from the top the first year, plant from the bottom (potatoes) the second year, add it as a wonderful addition to your compost pile in year 3. There’s a little work involved, of course, but all good gardening requires some work!

I’d be interested in your efforts — let me know if it’s successful for you!

 

by OCMGA Master Gardener Vicki Schilleman

Garden Conference Success!!

Brian Hudelson, UW-Wisconsin Extension, brings his extensive knowledge of plant diseases

This past Saturday (April 1), our Master Gardener group (Outagamie County Master Gardener Association) hosted an annual Garden Conference. As always, the Conference was a huge success — even the weather cooperated by sending us a sunny day with temperatures near 60 degrees!

Guest speaker Jim Beard shares information about Straw Bale Gardening

Every year, we sell out our Conference as seats are filled by those eager for Spring, excited to hear from our guest speakers, and interested in visiting with our many vendors! This year was no exception as 200 people filled the room and enjoyed the discussions about Straw Bale Gardening, Plant Diseases, Garden Planning/Photography, Incorporating Edibles into your garden, and fun Garden Tips and Tricks.

Author Stacy Tornio talks about her new book “Plants You Can’t Kill” with OCMGA member Chris Frederickson

Gorgeous varieties of Hostas for sale

Every year, the number of vendors who join us

increases and the variety of products continues to astonish our attendees. This year, we had garden decorations, jewelry, organic herbal soaps, lotions, and scrubs, batik scarves, tree charms, stone-cast garden leaves, wood furniture, live plants, garden tools, and much, much more.

Join us next year!

The Conference is always held at the end of March or early April each year. Make a note to check our website (www.ocmga.net) next year for details!

 

by OCMGA Master Gardener Vicki Schilleman

Expert’s Tip: Plants and Poultry

Scott Reuss, Marinette County UW-Extension Horticulture Educator

Poultry are generally not an integral part of a garden design process.  However, for many rural (and a seemingly increasing number of city) gardeners, poultry do take part in a symbiosis of systems that allow for distinctly improved home food production capacity.  Since National Poultry Day is celebrated on March 19, let’s review some of the roles that poultry can safely play in a plant management system.

First, let’s think recycling.  The classic reduce, reuse, recycle theme is lived out almost daily when you successfully integrate poultry and plants and the neat part is that it goes both directions.  Nearly all poultry species are very proficient at utilizing fruit and vegetable waste products that come either from your garden or your kitchen, or the ones that didn’t quite stay in great shape in storage.  These types of feeds not only provide basic nutrient and energy needs, but also provide the types of compounds often missing in formulated feeds.  Recycled plant material, along with insects and other living plant tissue the birds may be able to harvest, help allow the meat and eggs coming from those birds to have the flavor, color, and textural profiles which many people crave.

Plants get into the recycling act, too.  Poultry manure and litter make great fertilizer, providing all the nutrients that plants need – albeit not always in perfect proportions.  However, there is the chance for disease or parasite transfer when utilizing manure in the garden.  We need to remember some general precautions to minimize such risks and keep ourselves safe.  The key words are time and proximity.

Proximity is pretty easy to consider.  If you are applying manure to a garden area in which you are growing fruits or vegetables, you are increasing the risk of health issues.  That is pretty simple.  However, it does not mean that you cannot or should not do so.  This is where time comes into play.  Try to follow the 120 day rule, if possible.  After placing a manure product into or onto your garden soil, do not harvest fruits or vegetables from that area for 120 days.

Yes, the 120 day rule creates timing issues for us Wisconsinites, as well as the Yoopers I often assist.  Generally, we need to apply manure in the fall to truly minimize risk in next year’s crop. However, we may be able to sneak in early-spring applications in areas which grow full-season crops, especially if they are above-ground or off-the ground crops (sweet corn, trellised vegetables, etc…).  Another way to minimize risk is to compost these products first, which adds in extra time and also decreases nitrogen management issues due either to burn potential of the manure or of too much carbon loading occurring if you use a wood product based litter.

Most poultry can serve in-season or end-of-season roles in the garden, as well.  Ducks can help you manage certain types of plant pests (insects and slugs mostly) in non-edible garden areas. Geese can serve as weed managers, as they are very good grazers.  Guinea fowl are very good insect eaters and are even known to eat ticks, but expect that these noisy critters will create issues if you have any neighbors within earshot.

Chickens are certainly the most common and have both risks and rewards in-season.  Their scratching tendencies can help you at the end of the season, as you can turn your flock into your completed gardens and let them find insects, edible plant material, and do some shallow tillage for you that minimizes some weed issues.  However, you may often find yourself muttering, if not outright hollering and chasing them, about their exceptional ability to move mulch from around landscaped areas if they get out or figure out how to get past your fencing.  They can also cause issues for young plants, potted or containerized plants, and some other areas if they achieve accessing them.

We cannot delve into all aspects of managing poultry and plants together or separately.  A few other points, though.  For the plants, make sure you are thinking through nutrient needs, nutrient loading, and your rotations.  You can maximize the benefit of the manure by placing it into areas which are going to need the most nitrogen the next year (sweet corn, potatoes, crucifer crops) and you can also minimize risks by not placing it into areas which will be hosting shorter-season contamination vulnerable crops such as greens, root vegetables, or ground-touching vine crops.

If you are considering adding poultry, do some research first and don’t succumb to buying those really cute chicks you see at a local store some shopping Saturday.  First, make sure you can legally have poultry in your municipality – contact either general municipal office or zoning department, if you have one.  Most rural areas are fine, but many cities and villages either restrict species, numbers, or sex of poultry allowed; or do not allow them, at all.

Second, you have to have a livestock premise identification number to house poultry.  It is free and easy to obtain, by going to http://wiid.org and having your location information and species of animals being housed.  Other points to consider are to be honest with yourself about why you want poultry, as the answer to that question will affect what you get, and how you house them.  Get good management information and housing suggestions by visiting your UW-Extension office, or go online to either the appropriate UW-Extension links below, or another University’s site. Below are two to take a look at:

http://fyi.uwex.edu/poultry/ UW Poultry Specialist Ron Kean’s main page

http://richland.uwex.edu/agriculture/poultry-and-rabbits/   Richland County UW-Ext. web page

If I were to start into actual poultry management, this article would become WAY too long.  So, please do refer to the web pages above, or contact Ron Kean or Adam Hady through their web pages above, or agents like myself and we will help you get the information you need to start your poultry adventure.

Recycle Your Christmas Tree

Christmas trees are too often tossed unceremoniously onto the curb right after the holidays. But there’s no reason holiday evergreens can’t be allowed to serve long after the merry-making is over.

For a splash of instant green, cut the branches of pine, fir, spruce, or other needled evergreens and add them to barren window boxes or containers.

You can also use branches to protect dormant plants. A think cover of evergreen limbs helps keep the surface layer of soil moist, and also helps to stabilize soil temperature, reducing the rapid cycles of frost and thaw that can heave perennials and shrubs from the ground and rip their roots.

Christmas greenery also can be used as tracery on trellises and arbors. Held in place with plastic ties or string, cut boughs give plants like climbing roses, and vines like grapes or clematis, a good-looking shield from drying winter winds and sun.

In addition, leftover evergreens are useful for augmenting the natural foliage around a bird feeder or bath. Wild birds like protection and aren’t choosy whether their evergreen screen is living or dead.

There is an art to denuding a Christmas tree, though, and pruning shears or loppers are a must. Heavy gloves make it easier to handle the rough bark and the needles. If you must cut up the tree inside, cover the floor with a plastic sheet to prevent a mess of needles and sap.

Remove the evergreen boughs from gardens and planters when the tips of early spring bloomers, like crocus or snowdrops, have pushed about an inch out of the ground. Where no bulbs are planted, leave the branches until mid-April or whenever spring seems securely in place.

Orchid Cactus

by OCMGA Master Gardener Tom Wentzel

untitledI started this plant from a leaf cutting 8+ years ago. It loves the indoor south exposure where it has been since I got it. I really don’t pay much attention to it. It is a vining plant and needs support. When I gets to be 10 or 12 feet long, I hack it back. It is a plant the makes a very bold statement via its foliage. This leaf is 22 inches long.I had pretty much given up on seeing it bloom until a couple days ago – then I noticed the flower buds.

untitledThese were quite a surprise and I was hoping that they would be open the following day. That night I thought I would take another peak at them. WOW!

Even the internal structure is extraordinary.
After seeing the flower, I was able to determine that the variety is most likely “Queen of the Night”. That certainly is an appropriate name. The flowers last only one night. Looking more closely at the plant, I found four other spent blossoms that I had missed. There are two more buds developing. This plant is well worth having in your collection just for the foliage. The flowers put it over the top. It is very easy to grow.

untitled

Other members of this family bloom during the day with individual flowers lasting a week or so. Colors tend to be in the red/pink end of the spectrum and the plants can be quite a bit smaller, lending themselves to hanging baskets.