Tag Archive | Canning

Too Many Tomatoes?

by OCMGA Master Gardner Mary Learman

This is a fantastic recipe for the glut of tomatoes in the summer. I like to use it for that last crop of the year, when there isn’t enough for a big canning session but too much to eat.

Untitled1Passata is such a useful store cupboard item to use in all sorts of savory dishes. You can use it as is for a quick pasta dish, pizza sauce, add it to premade tomato sauces and soups for an authentic taste. If you are all canned out, simply pour the finished passata into containers and freeze to use in the winter. Add some to risottos, gumbos, soups, stews and polentas for a rich undernote of harvest.

Roasted Tomato Passata.

To make two 16-oz jars, you will need:-

4 ½ lb. ripe tomatoes
7 oz. shallots
3-4 garlic cloves, peeled and thinly sliced
a few sprigs of herbs of your choice – basil, thyme, oregano, rosemary
1 t. sea salt
½ t. black pepper
1 t. sugar
2 fl. oz olive oil
2 T. commercial lemon juice

Preheat oven to 350°F.

Cut the tomatoes in half and place then cut side up in a single layer in a large roasting pan. Scatter the shallots, garlic, herbs, salt, pepper, sugar and oil over the top. Roast for about 50 minutes to one hour, until the tomatoes are well softened. Remove from the oven and puree using a food mill.

Put the tomato puree into a pan, add the lemon juice and bring to the boiling point. Pour into hot sterilized jars and seal. Water bath for 35 minutes.

Use within one year. Once opened, refrigerate and use within a few days.

Always practice safe canning – http://nchfp.uga.edu/publications/publications_usda.html will answer all your questions.

Advertisements

Tips to Keep Your Canning Safe!

Remember the old stories about folks getting sick from eating someone’s canned green beans?  I found out that was E.Coli!  Nothing to mess around with. When you have a pile of rhubarb, tomatoes,  or other fruits and vegetables take care to preserve them correctly so you don’t endanger yourself or others and so that you don’t waste your harvest.
The following tips are from a lovely article by B. Ingram written in 2011. The article is from the UW Extension which is a great resource for articles on all kinds of topics to enhance your summer and your garden. Here’s a link to the article if you’d like to view it, http://outagamie.uwex.edu/files/2011/06/Tips-for-a-Successful-Home-Canning-Season2.pdf, but here’s a summary.
First, start with a well tested recipe and there are plenty of resources to find these. You can visit The National Center for Home Food Preservation at http://nchfp.uga.edu/ or in Wisconsin the resource http://www.foodsafety.wisc.edu/.
Use recipes that are up to date and equipment that is in good working order.

If you are using a pressure canner there are resources for having them tested every year which is recommended by the Extension.

Make sure your jars and screw rings are in good shape and sterilize them before use. Discard any jars that are chipped and toss any rings with rust. Purchase new lids every year, don’t ever try to re-use the lids!

And the final tip from the article discourages using our creativity when it comes to canning!  I guess we can save the creativity for the garden where it doesn’t have such a direct effect on our food safety.
Thanks to Mary for bringing the article to our attention!
Posted by Rachel

Preserving some of the year's rhubarb! Chutney and sauce for later this year!

Preserving some of the year’s rhubarb! Chutney and sauce for later this year!