Garden a little bedraggled?

If summer’s heat and drought conditions (at least at my house) have your garden hanging it’s head, perk things up with some tips for keeping borders beautiful even when stressed.

15175061835_8cbaa0cf47_z

Goldenrod, Black-eyed Susans, Joe Pye Weed are all drought tolerant plants

Watering makes a HUGE difference. Keeping plants watered is essential for a good-looking garden, but it can turn into a chore when temperatures are high and it doesn’t rain. Save yourself time and money with these watering tips:

  • Easy irrigation – a simple soaker hose is one of the most basic ways to irrigate. Lay a porous hose down on your garden, and it’ll weep water onto the soil. Because you’re applying moisture right at soil level, there’s less loss due to evaporation. Cover your hose with a couple of inches of mulch to protect it from the sun’s UV rays and help it last longer.
  • Check your irrigation system to make sure all zones are programmed, then turn it on only when it’s needed.
  • Sometimes it’s easier to water with a hose. Avoid dragging it all over the yard by grouping containers together.

Stop weeds and drought stress. Plants that aren’t stressed by aggressive weeds or lack of moisture are healthier and bloom longer with more flowers. Ideally, you’ve mulched in spring, but it’s never too late to put some down.

  • One of the best things you can do to keep plants fresh in summer is to apply a 2- to 3-inch layer of some type of organic mulch. If it’s looking a little thin or matted down in your garden, use a leaf rake to fluff what’s there and top it off, if needed.
  • If drought stress has already affected your annuals or perennials and you notice brown and crispy flowers or foliage, go ahead and cut off what’s damaged. Sometimes the whole plant looks bad. In that case, prune all the dead-looking stuff out. Make sure there’s enough mulch and water so the soil stays evenly moist for the rest of the season. Many perennials will start growing again from the crown in a week or two. Some plants, such as bleeding heart, will go completely dormant, but grow again the following spring.

Get rid of spent blooms. Deadheading often — even daily — will keep your garden looking its best. You’ll get a faster repeat bloom and avoid unsightly spent blossoms hanging around. Deadheading encourages your plant to produce more flowers and store energy for winter instead of forming seed heads. In fact, some people don’t like the look of hosta blooms so they cut them off below the foliage as they emerge.

Heat stress and lack of water can make plants susceptible to pests and disease so keep a close eye on your plants and act quickly if you spot trouble!

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s